A4 Article in conference proceedings
The “Architectures” of Successful Remote Collaborative Problem Solving : Exploring Commitment in Dyadic Interaction (2022)


Pöysä-Tarhonen, J., & Awwal, N. (2022). The “Architectures” of Successful Remote Collaborative Problem Solving : Exploring Commitment in Dyadic Interaction. In A. Weinberger, W. Chen, D. Hernández-Leo, & B. Chen (Eds.), CSCL 2022 : Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (pp. 75-82). International society of the learning sciences. Computer-supported collaborative learning. https://repository.isls.org//handle/1/8387


JYU authors or editors


Publication details

All authors or editorsPöysä-Tarhonen, Johanna; Awwal, Nafisa

Parent publicationCSCL 2022 : Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning

Parent publication editorsWeinberger, Armin; Chen, Wenli; Hernández-Leo, Davinia; Chen, Bodong

Place and date of conferenceHiroshima, Japan6.-10.6.2022

eISBN978-1-7373306-4-6

Journal or seriesComputer-supported collaborative learning

ISSN1573-4552

eISSN1819-0146

Publication year2022

Pages range75–82

Number of pages in the book612

PublisherInternational society of the learning sciences

Publication countryUnited States

Publication languageEnglish

Persistent website addresshttps://repository.isls.org//handle/1/8387

Publication open accessOpenly available

Publication channel open accessOpen Access channel

Publication is parallel published (JYX)https://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/82260


Abstract

During successful collaborative problem solving (CPS), participants are expected not only to share and process information to solve the task, but also to show responsiveness and commitment to their partners. Accordingly, this exploratory study aims, via two contrasting cases, to acquire a preliminary understanding of how commitments and successful CPS come together in remote, dyadic interaction. To do so, the study relies on objective and subjective measures and combines group with individual levels of analysis on log files and cued interviews. The results revealed how commitments were interrelated with efficient coordination of interactions during CPS. Coordinated, well-communicated problem-solving trails, in turn, resulted in positive outcomes regarding the problem-solution. Thus, if commitments can reduce uncertainty of the partner’s actions, required in efficient coordination, to focus on the “anatomy” of commitments can provide us with a better understanding of what may (dis)favour successful CPS to take place in this context.


Keywordsproblem solvingonline studydistance studiescollaborative learninginteractioncommitting oneself


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Ministry reportingYes

Reporting Year2022

JUFO rating1


Last updated on 2024-15-06 at 01:46