A4 Article in conference proceedings
Thoughts in concert : A multi-method approach to investigate the effect of performers’ focus of attention (2013)


Van Zijl, A. G. W., & Luck, G. (2013). Thoughts in concert : A multi-method approach to investigate the effect of performers’ focus of attention. In A. Williamon, & W. Goeb (Eds.), Proceedings of the International Symposium on Performance Science 2013. European Association of Conservatoires . https://performancescience.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/isps2013_proceedings.pdf


JYU authors or editors


Publication details

All authors or editors: Van Zijl, Anemone G. W.; Luck, Geoff

Parent publication: Proceedings of the International Symposium on Performance Science 2013

Parent publication editors: Williamon, Aaron; Goeb, Werner

Place and date of conference: Vienna, Austria, 28.-31.8.2013

ISBN: 978-2-9601378-0-4

Publication year: 2013

Number of pages in the book: 838

Publisher: European Association of Conservatoires

Publication country: Belgium

Publication language: English

Persistent website address: https://performancescience.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/isps2013_proceedings.pdf

Publication open access: Openly available

Publication channel open access: Open Access channel


Abstract

Does it matter what a performer feels or thinks about while performing? To investigate the effect of performers’ focus of attention on their performances we asked eight violinists to play the same musical phrase in response to three different instructions. The first instruction was to focus on the technical aspects of playing. The second instruction was to give an expressive performance. Following a sadness-inducing mood induction task, the third instruction was to play while focusing on felt emotions. High quality audio and three-dimensional motion-capture recordings were made of all performances. Subsequently, thirty individuals rated how much they liked each performance, how skilled they thought each performer was, and to what extent each performance was expressive of sadness. Computational analysis of the audio and motion-capture recordings revealed differences between performance conditions. Statistical analysis of the perception data revealed that individuals preferred the Expressive performances to the Technical and Emotional ones. In addition, the Expressive performances were rated as played by the most skilled performers. The Emotional performances were rated as being most expressive of sadness. The findings suggest that a performer’s focus of attention has an effect on the audio features, movement features, and perception of their performances.


Keywords: performers; musicians; playing an instrument; emotions; mood; expression (communication)

Free keywords: performing musicians; technique; expressivity; emotions; multi-method approach


Contributing organizations


Ministry reporting: Yes


Last updated on 2022-27-06 at 11:30