A1 Journal article (refereed)
Educational and family-related determinants of organized sports participation patterns from adolescence to emerging adulthood : A four-year follow-up study (2022)


Rinta-Antila, K., Koski, P., Heinonen, O. J., Korpelainen, R., Parkkari, J., Savonen, K., Toivo, K., Uusitalo, A., Valtonen, M., Vasankari, T., Villberg, J., & Kokko, S. (2022). Educational and family-related determinants of organized sports participation patterns from adolescence to emerging adulthood : A four-year follow-up study. International Journal of Health Promotion and Education, Early online. https://doi.org/10.1080/14635240.2022.2116943


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Publication details

All authors or editorsRinta-Antila, Katja; Koski, Pasi; Heinonen, Olli J; Korpelainen, Raija; Parkkari, Jari; Savonen, Kai; Toivo, Kerttu; Uusitalo, Arja; Valtonen, Maarit; Vasankari, Tommi; et al.

Journal or seriesInternational Journal of Health Promotion and Education

ISSN1463-5240

eISSN2164-9545

Publication year2022

Publication date05/09/2022

VolumeEarly online

PublisherRoutledge

Publication countryUnited Kingdom

Publication languageEnglish

DOIhttps://doi.org/10.1080/14635240.2022.2116943

Publication open accessOpenly available

Publication channel open accessPartially open access channel

Publication is parallel published (JYX)https://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/83215


Abstract

This study aimed to identify organized sports participation patterns and their prevalence from adolescence to emerging adulthood, and the educational and family-related determinants of the patterns. Adolescents in the Finnish Health Promoting Sports Club (FHPSC) study answered a health behaviour questionnaire and reported on sports club participation at ages 15 and 19 (N = 609). In emerging adulthood, dropouts (total 41.05%; females 43.72%; males 36.56%), maintainers (30.87; 26.44; 38.33), nonparticipants (27.59; 29.32; 24.67), and joiners (0.49; 0.52; 0.44) (p = .024) were identified. A mixed multinomial logistic regression analysis showed, that male gender, as compared to female gender, increased the odds of being a maintainer rather than a nonparticipant or dropout. Among females, high achievement at school and aspiration towards upper secondary school at age 15 increased the odds of being a maintainer at age 19 rather than a nonparticipant. High achievement at school and experiencing a (strong) decrease in parental support for physical activity/sport increased the odds of being a dropout rather than a nonparticipant. Having no experience of a strong decrease in parental support increased the odds of being a maintainer rather than a dropout. Among males, aspiration towards upper secondary school increased the odds of being a maintainer or dropout rather than a nonparticipant. The most common reason for dropping out was study, which was also the most prevalent life status at age 19. The findings highlight a need for more flexible possibilities to combine organized sports participation and school studies, and the importance of parental support for physical activity/sport.


Keywordsyoung peopleyoung adultsphysical hobbiessports clubsstudy performanceparentshealth promotioncohort studyfollow-up study

Free keywordscohort studies; health promotion; sports; academic success; parental support


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Ministry reportingYes

Reporting Year2022

JUFO rating1


Last updated on 2024-03-04 at 21:46