D3 Article in professional conference proceedings
Drumming in time is easy : social bonding effects of synchrony arise from reduced cognitive load (2023)


Bamford, J. S., Tarr, B., Miles, L., & Cohen, E. (2023). Drumming in time is easy : social bonding effects of synchrony arise from reduced cognitive load. In M. Tsuzaki, M. Sadakata, S. Ikegami, T. Matsui, M. Okano, & H. Shoda (Eds.), ICMPC17-APSCOM7 : The e-proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition and the 7th Conference of the Asia-Pacific Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music. Nihon University.


JYU authors or editors


Publication details

All authors or editorsBamford, Joshua S.; Tarr, Bronwyn; Miles, Lynden; Cohen, Emma

Parent publicationICMPC17-APSCOM7 : The e-proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition and the 7th Conference of the Asia-Pacific Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music

Parent publication editorsTsuzaki, Minoru; Sadakata, Makiko; Ikegami, Shimpei; Matsui, Toshie; Okano, Masahiro; Shoda, Haruka

Place and date of conferenceTokyo, Japan24.-28.8.2023

Publication year2023

Publication date23/08/2023

Number of pages in the book774

PublisherNihon University

Publication countryJapan

Publication languageEnglish

Publication open accessNot open

Publication channel open access

Publication is parallel published (JYX)https://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/93777


Abstract

The synchrony-bonding effect has often been observed, but the mechanisms behind it remain poorly
understood. Numerous possible mechanisms have been proposed, however simple perceptual processing
explanations have been largely ignored. The present study tested a theory based on processing fluency across two
controlled experiments. In the first study, 104 participants completed a drumming task in a within-subjects design
in which they also completed a secondary visual attention task. We found that when drumming in non-synchrony,
performance was worse on the secondary task, indicating increased cognitive load. In the second study, 82
participants performed a similar drumming task, however instead of the secondary task they were asked to self-report how difficult they found the tapping task and how much they liked the person they were drumming with.
Participants reported that drumming in synchrony felt easier and produced greater feelings of social connection
than drumming out of synchrony. Taken together, these studies suggest that synchrony may promote processing
fluency, which in turn leads to prosocial effects.


Keywordsrhythmsynchronizingsocial interactionprosocialitycognitive processesevolutionary psychologymusic psychologycognitive musicology

Free keywordssynchrony; entrainment; social bonding; visual attention; evolution


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Ministry reportingYes

Reporting Year2023


Last updated on 2024-03-07 at 00:47