A2 Review article, Literature review, Systematic review
Three team and organisational culture myths and their consequences for sport psychology research and practice (2020)


McDougall, Michael; Ronkainen, Noora; Richardson, David; Littlewood, Martin; Nesti, Mark (2020). Three team and organisational culture myths and their consequences for sport psychology research and practice. International Review of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 13 (1), 147-162. DOI: 10.1080/1750984X.2019.1638433


JYU authors or editors


Publication details

All authors or editors: McDougall, Michael; Ronkainen, Noora; Richardson, David; Littlewood, Martin; Nesti, Mark

Journal or series: International Review of Sport and Exercise Psychology

ISSN: 1750-984X

eISSN: 1750-9858

Publication year: 2020

Volume: 13

Issue number: 1

Article number: 147-162

Publisher: Routledge

Publication country: United Kingdom

Publication language: English

DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/1750984X.2019.1638433

Open Access: Publication channel is not openly available

Publication is parallel published (JYX): https://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/65780


Abstract

In this article, three prevailing myths about team and organisational culture – an increasingly popular topic in applied sport psychology research and practice – are identified, reviewed and challenged. These are; that culture is characterised only by what is shared, that culture is a variable and therefore something that a particular group has, and that culture change involves moving from the old culture to an entirely new one. We present a challenge to each myth through the introduction of alternative theoretical and empirical material and discuss the implications for sport psychology research and practice. The intent of this endeavour is to stimulate debate on how to best conceptualise and study culture. More broadly, we aim to encourage sport psychologists to consider team and organisational culture in new and/or varied ways, beyond current conceptualisations of consensus, clarity, integration and as a management tool to facilitate operational excellence and on-field athletic success.


Keywords: sports; team sports; teams; organisational culture; critical realism; conflicts (societal events); sport psychology

Free keywords: elite sport; teams; applied practice; organizational culture; critical realism; interpretation; conflict; sport psychology


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Ministry reporting: Yes

Preliminary JUFO rating: 2


Last updated on 2020-18-08 at 13:06