A1 Journal article (refereed)
Sublethal Pyrethroid Insecticide Exposure Carries Positive Fitness Effects Over Generations in a Pest Insect (2019)


Margus, Aigi; Piiroinen, Saija; Lehmann, Philipp; Tikka, Santtu; Karvanen, Juha; Lindström, Leena (2019). Sublethal Pyrethroid Insecticide Exposure Carries Positive Fitness Effects Over Generations in a Pest Insect. Scientific Reports, 9, 11320. DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-47473-1


JYU authors or editors


Publication details

All authors or editors: Margus, Aigi; Piiroinen, Saija; Lehmann, Philipp; Tikka, Santtu; Karvanen, Juha; Lindström, Leena

Journal or series: Scientific Reports

eISSN: 2045-2322

Publication year: 2019

Volume: 9

Article number: 11320

Publisher: Nature Publishing Group

Publication country: United Kingdom

Publication language: English

DOI: http://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-47473-1

Open Access: Publication published in an open access channel

Publication is parallel published (JYX): https://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/65221


Abstract

Stress tolerance and adaptation to stress are known to facilitate species invasions. Many invasive species are also pests and insecticides are used to control them, which could shape their overall tolerance to stress. It is well-known that heavy insecticide usage leads to selection of resistant genotypes but less is known about potential effects of mild sublethal insecticide usage. We studied whether stressful, sublethal pyrethroid insecticide exposure has within-generational and/or maternal transgenerational effects on fitness-related traits in the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata) and whether maternal insecticide exposure affects insecticide tolerance of offspring. Sublethal insecticide stress exposure had positive within-and transgenerational effects. Insecticide-stressed larvae had higher adult survival and higher adult body mass than those not exposed to stress. Furthermore, offspring whose mothers were exposed to insecticide stress had higher larval and pupal survival and were heavier as adults (only females) than those descending from control mothers. Maternal insecticide stress did not explain differences in lipid content of the offspring. To conclude, stressful insecticide exposure has positive transgenerational fitness effects in the offspring. Therefore, unsuccessful insecticide control of invasive pest species may lead to undesired side effects since survival and higher body mass are known to facilitate population growth and invasion success.


Keywords: stress (biological phenomena); insecticides; resistance (medicine); adaptation (change); introduced species; insect pests; Colorado potato beetle

Free keywords: stress tolerance; adaptation to stress; species invasions


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Ministry reporting: Yes

Reporting Year: 2019

JUFO rating: 1


Last updated on 2020-09-07 at 11:56