A4 Article in conference proceedings
Ethics in Designing Intelligent Systems (2020)


Saariluoma, Pertti; Leikas, Jaana (2020). Ethics in Designing Intelligent Systems. In Ahram, Tareq; Taiar, Redha; Colson, Serge; Choplin, Arnaud (Eds.) Human Interaction and Emerging Technologies : Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Human Interaction and Emerging Technologies (IHIET 2019), Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing, 1018. Cham: Springer, 47-52. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-25629-6_8


JYU authors or editors


Publication details

All authors or editors: Saariluoma, Pertti; Leikas, Jaana

Parent publication: Human Interaction and Emerging Technologies : Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Human Interaction and Emerging Technologies (IHIET 2019)

Parent publication editors: Ahram, Tareq; Taiar, Redha; Colson, Serge; Choplin, Arnaud

Conference:

International Conference on Human Interaction and Emerging Technologies

Place and date of conference: Nice, France, 22.-24.8.2019

ISBN: 978-3-030-25628-9

eISBN: 978-3-030-25629-6

Journal or series: Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing

ISSN: 2194-5357

eISSN: 2194-5365

Publication year: 2020

Number in series: 1018

Pages range: 47-52

Number of pages in the book: 1020

Publisher: Springer

Place of Publication: Cham

Publication country: Switzerland

Publication language: English

DOI: http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-25629-6_8

Open Access: Publication channel is not openly available


Abstract

The idea of Hume’s guillotine contains the argument that one cannot derive values from facts. As intelligent systems operate with facts, Hume’s famous dilemma seems to contradict the very idea of being able to create ethical intelligent systems. In a closer look, ethics is a system of rules guiding actions. Actions always have factual or cognitive aspects, as well as evaluative or emotional aspects. Therefore, Hume’s juxtaposition of facts and norms is not well-founded. Instead of separating the facts and norms it should rather ask what kinds of facts are associated to what kinds of norms. Consequently, Hume’s guillotine sets no limits in processing ethical information, as one can combine facts and values while constructing information processes. However, intelligent machines cannot process ethical information independently of the human mind, as one cannot discuss ‘relevance’ in any formal language. Intelligent systems can be given descriptions of ethical situations and related norms, but machines cannot initiate ethical rules themselves.


Keywords: intelligent systems; artificial intelligence; system design; ethics; ethicality

Free keywords: ethics; Hume’s guillotine; appraisal; designing intelligent systems; The problem of relevance


Contributing organizations


Ministry reporting: Yes

Reporting Year: 2020

Preliminary JUFO rating: 1


Last updated on 2020-09-07 at 23:12