A1 Journal article (refereed)
Self‐control and health‐related behaviour : The role of implicit self‐control, trait self‐control, and lay beliefs in self‐control (2019)


Hagger, M. S., Gucciardi, D. F., Turrell, A. S., & Hamilton, K. (2019). Self‐control and health‐related behaviour : The role of implicit self‐control, trait self‐control, and lay beliefs in self‐control. British Journal of Health Psychology, 24(4), 764-786. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjhp.12378


JYU authors or editors


Publication details

All authors or editors: Hagger, Martin S.; Gucciardi, Daniel F.; Turrell, Amelia S.; Hamilton, Kyra

Journal or series: British Journal of Health Psychology

ISSN: 1359-107X

eISSN: 2044-8287

Publication year: 2019

Volume: 24

Issue number: 4

Pages range: 764-786

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons; The British Psychological Society

Publication country: United Kingdom

Publication language: English

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/bjhp.12378

Publication open access: Not open

Publication channel open access:

Publication is parallel published (JYX): https://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/66084


Abstract

Objectives:
We tested unique contribution of trait self‐control, implicit self‐control, and lay beliefs in self‐control beliefs to the prediction of health‐related behaviours. We also tested whether relations between trait self‐control and health‐related behaviour, and between implicit self‐control and health‐related behaviours, were moderated by self‐control beliefs.

Design:
Cross‐sectional, correlational.

Methods:
Students (N = 176) completed self‐report measures of trait self‐control, lay beliefs that self‐control is limited or non‐limited, non‐planning, participation in health‐related behaviours (impulsive eating, impulsive drinking, exercise avoidance, watching diet, alcohol consumption, physical activity participation), and demographic variables. Participants also completed a measure of implicit self‐control using an implicit association test.

Results:
Analyses indicated significant negative relations between implicit self‐control and impulsive drinking and alcohol consumption. We also found a positive relationship between implicit self‐control and exercise behaviour, and a negative relationship between implicit self‐control and impulsive eating, both of which fell marginally short of statistical significance. Trait self‐control significantly predicted all behavioural measures and attenuated relations between implicit self‐control and health‐related behaviour. We found no relations between lay beliefs in self‐control and health‐related behaviour. Moderated path analyses revealed that lay beliefs in self‐control moderated relations between trait self‐control and impulsive drinking, implicit self‐control and exercise avoidance, and implicit self‐control and physical activity participation.

Conclusions:
Findings suggest that trait self‐control was a consistent correlate of health‐related behaviour, while the effect sizes of relationships between implicit self‐control and health‐related behaviours were small. Strength of relations between trait self‐control and health‐related behaviours may depend on whether or not individuals believe self‐control is limited.


Keywords: self-control; social cognition; health behaviour

Free keywords: dual‐process theories; response inhibition; self‐regulation; theories of social cognition; theory integration


Contributing organizations


Ministry reporting: Yes

Reporting Year: 2019

JUFO rating: 1


Last updated on 2021-28-09 at 14:08