A3 Book section, Chapters in research books
The occupation of Runet? : The tightening state regulation of the Russian-language section of the internet (2020)


Lonkila, Markku; Shpakovskaya, Larisa; Torchinsky, Philip (2020). The occupation of Runet? : The tightening state regulation of the Russian-language section of the internet. In Wijermars, Mariëlle; Lehtisaari, Katja (Eds.) Freedom of Expression in Russia's New Mediasphere, BASEES/Routledge Series on Russian and East European Studies. Abingdon: Routledge, 17-38. DOI: 10.4324/9780429437205-2


JYU authors or editors


Publication details

All authors or editors: Lonkila, Markku; Shpakovskaya, Larisa; Torchinsky, Philip

Parent publication: Freedom of Expression in Russia's New Mediasphere

Parent publication editors: Wijermars, Mariëlle; Lehtisaari, Katja

ISBN: 978-1-138-34665-9

eISBN: 978-0-429-43720-5

Journal or series: BASEES/Routledge Series on Russian and East European Studies

Publication year: 2020

Pages range: 17-38

Number of pages in the book: 294

Publisher: Routledge

Place of Publication: Abingdon

Publication country: United Kingdom

Publication language: English

DOI: http://doi.org/10.4324/9780429437205-2

Open Access: Publication channel is not openly available

Publication is parallel published (JYX): https://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/68318


Abstract

In this chapter, we scrutinise the Russian state’s regulation for political purposes of the Russian-language section of the internet or ‘Runet’, as it is often dubbed in Russia. We will focus on those regulative actions which came into force during and after the protest wave in Russia in 2011–2013. Internet and social media played an important role in the mobilisation of these protests that challenged the legitimacy of the ruling elite. We argue that the protests marked a watershed moment in the Russian government’s information policy, which had previously mainly functioned through the control of the federal Russian TV channels. After the protests, the Kremlin mounted a campaign to regulate the political use of Runet. This campaign was implemented through a wide variety of on- and offline actions, which we call the ‘occupation’ of Runet. Instead of an isolated event, the occupation can be seen as part of the more general trend of restricting Russian civil society during the Putin–Medvedev tandem.


Keywords: Internet; social media; political activity; civic society; freedom of speech; political control; legal regulation; censorship

Free keywords: Russia


Contributing organizations


Ministry reporting: Yes

Reporting Year: 2020

Preliminary JUFO rating: 3


Last updated on 2020-18-08 at 13:04