A1 Journal article (refereed)
Associations Between Trajectories of Leisure-Time Physical Activity and Television Viewing Time Across Adulthood : The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study (2019)


Yang, X., Lounassalo, I., Kankaanpää, A., Hirvensalo, M., Rovio, S. P., Tolvanen, A., Biddle, S. J. H., Helajärvi, H., Palomäki, S. H., Salin, K., Hutri-Kähönen, N., Raitakari, O. T., & Tammelin, T. H. (2019). Associations Between Trajectories of Leisure-Time Physical Activity and Television Viewing Time Across Adulthood : The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study. Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 16(12), 1078-1084. https://doi.org/10.1123/jpah.2018-0650


JYU authors or editors


Publication details

All authors or editors: Yang, Xiaolin; Lounassalo, Irinja; Kankaanpää, Anna; Hirvensalo, Mirja; Rovio, Suvi P.; Tolvanen, Asko; Biddle, Stuart J. H.; Helajärvi, Harri; Palomäki, Sanna H.; Salin, Kasper; et al.

Journal or series: Journal of Physical Activity and Health

ISSN: 1543-3080

eISSN: 1543-5474

Publication year: 2019

Volume: 16

Issue number: 12

Pages range: 1078-1084

Publisher: Human Kinetics Publishers

Publication country: United States

Publication language: English

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1123/jpah.2018-0650

Publication open access: Not open

Publication channel open access:

Publication is parallel published (JYX): https://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/67011


Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was to examine trajectories of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) and television-viewing (TV) time and their associations in adults over 10 years. Methods: The sample comprised 2934 participants (men, 46.0%) aged 24–39 years in 2001 and they were followed up for 10 years. LTPA and TV time were assessed using self-report questionnaires in 2001, 2007, and 2011. Longitudinal LTPA and TV-time trajectories and their interactions were analyzed with mixture modeling. Results: Three LTPA (persistently highly active, 15.8%; persistently moderately active, 60.8%; and persistently low active, 23.5%) and 4 TV time (consistently low, 38.6%; consistently moderate, 48.2%; consistently high, 11.7%; and consistently very high, 1.5%) trajectory classes were identified. Persistently highly active women had a lower probability of consistently high TV time than persistently low-active women (P = .02), whereas men who were persistently highly active had a higher probability of consistently moderate TV time and a lower probability of consistently low TV time than their persistently low-active counterparts (P = .03 and P = .01, respectively). Conclusions: Maintaining high LTPA levels were accompanied by less TV over time in women, but not in men. The associations were partially explained by education, body mass index, and smoking.


Keywords: physical activeness; physical training; leisure; television (mass media); sitting; epidemiology; adulthood

Free keywords: exercise; sedentary behavior; screen time; epidemiology


Contributing organizations


Related projects


Ministry reporting: Yes

Reporting Year: 2019

JUFO rating: 1


Last updated on 2021-09-06 at 09:15