A1 Journal article (refereed)
Effects of military training on plasma amino acid concentrations and their associations with overreaching (2020)


Ikonen, Jenni N.; Joro, Raimo; Uusitalo, Arja L.T.; Kyröläinen, Heikki; Kovanen, Vuokko; Atalay, Mustafa; Tanskanen-Tervo, Minna M. (2020). Effects of military training on plasma amino acid concentrations and their associations with overreaching. Experimental Biology and Medicine, 245 (12), 1029-1038. DOI: 10.1177/1535370220923130


JYU authors or editors


Publication details

All authors or editors: Ikonen, Jenni N.; Joro, Raimo; Uusitalo, Arja L.T.; Kyröläinen, Heikki; Kovanen, Vuokko; Atalay, Mustafa; Tanskanen-Tervo, Minna M.

Journal or series: Experimental Biology and Medicine

ISSN: 1535-3702

eISSN: 1535-3699

Publication year: 2020

Volume: 245

Issue number: 12

Pages range: 1029-1038

Publisher: Sage Publications

Publication country: United Kingdom

Publication language: English

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/1535370220923130

Open Access: Publication channel is not openly available

Publication channel open access:

Publication open access:

Publication is parallel published (JYX): https://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/72505


Abstract

Amino acids are thought to have a key role in the processes contributing to overreaching development through their metabolic properties and neuronal functions. In the present study, the effects of 10-week military training on the concentrations of 19 amino acids were investigated. Plasma amino acid concentrations were measured at rest from 53 healthy male conscripts on weeks 1, 4, 7, and 9 of their military service. Conscripts were classified as overreached and non-overreached. Overreaching classification was based on fulfilling at least three of five criteria: greater than 5% decrease in maximal oxygen uptake, increased rating perceived exertion (RPE), and decreased lactate-RPE ratio in submaximal marching test, admitting feeling overloaded and both increased scores in fatigue and decreased scores in vigor in the Profile of Mood States Adolescents. Eight conscripts (15%) were classified as overreached; their glutamine–glutamate ratio and alanine and arginine levels were significantly lower (P < 0.05) and glutamate concentration significantly higher (P < 0.05) in comparison to their non-overreached counterparts. The levels of arginine increased (P < 0.05) and tryptophan (P < 0.001) decreased in both groups throughout the study. The tyrosine concentration increased in non-overreached but, in contrast, remained at the same level in overreached individuals (P < 0.05). The results suggest that alterations in the levels of three metabolically important amino acids, alanine, glutamate and arginine, and the possibly neuroactive tyrosine and tryptophan might explain some of the physical and psychological symptoms of overreaching. The present study also confirms the potential use of glutamine–glutamate ratio as a tool for detecting overreaching.


Keywords: military education; physiological effects; metabolism; metabolic products; amino acids; overtraining

Free keywords: overreaching; overtraining; military training; amino acids; glutamine–glutamate ratio; metabolism


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Ministry reporting: Yes

Preliminary JUFO rating: 1


Last updated on 2021-30-04 at 15:52