A1 Journal article (refereed)
Higher aggression is related to poorer academic performance in compulsory education (2020)


Vuoksimaa, Eero; Rose, Richard J.; Pulkkinen, Lea; Palviainen, Teemu; Rimfeld, Kaili; Lundström, Sebastian; Bartels, Meike; van Beijsterveldt, Catharina; Hendriks, Anne; de Zeeuw, Eveline L. et al. (2020). Higher aggression is related to poorer academic performance in compulsory education. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Early View. DOI: 10.1111/jcpp.13273


JYU authors or editors


Publication details

All authors or editors: Vuoksimaa, Eero; Rose, Richard J.; Pulkkinen, Lea; Palviainen, Teemu; Rimfeld, Kaili; Lundström, Sebastian; Bartels, Meike; van Beijsterveldt, Catharina; Hendriks, Anne; de Zeeuw, Eveline L.; et al.

Journal or series: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry

ISSN: 0021-9630

eISSN: 1469-7610

Publication year: 2020

Volume: Early View

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

Publication country: United Kingdom

Publication language: English

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13273

Open Access: Open access publication published in a hybrid channel

Publication is parallel published (JYX): https://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/69712


Abstract

Background
To conduct a comprehensive assessment of the association between aggression and academic performance in compulsory education.
Method
We studied aggression and academic performance in over 27,000 individuals from four European twin cohorts participating in the ACTION consortium (Aggression in Children: Unraveling gene‐environment interplay to inform Treatment and InterventiON strategies). Individual level data on aggression at ages 7–16 were assessed by three instruments (Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment, Multidimensional Peer Nomination Inventory, Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire) including parental, teacher and self‐reports. Academic performance was measured with teacher‐rated grade point averages (ages 12–14) or standardized test scores (ages 12–16). Random effect meta‐analytical correlations with academic performance were estimated for parental ratings (in all four cohorts) and self‐ratings (in three cohorts).
Results
All between‐family analyses indicated significant negative aggression–academic performance associations with correlations ranging from −.06 to −.33. Results were similar across different ages, instruments and raters and either with teacher‐rated grade point averages or standardized test scores as measures of academic performance. Meta‐analytical r ’s were −.20 and −.23 for parental and self‐ratings, respectively. In within‐family analyses of all twin pairs, the negative aggression–academic performance associations were statistically significant in 14 out of 17 analyses (r = −.17 for parental‐ and r = −.16 for self‐ratings). Separate analyses in monozygotic (r = −.07 for parental and self‐ratings), same‐sex dizygotic (r ’s = −.16 and −.17 for parental and self‐ratings) and opposite‐sex dizygotic (r ’s = −.21 and −.19 for parental and self‐ratings) twin pairs suggested partial confounding by genetic effects.
Conclusions
There is a robust negative association between aggression and academic performance in compulsory education. Part of these associations were explained by shared genetic effects, but some evidence of a negative association between aggression and academic performance remained even in within‐family analyses of monozygotic twin pairs.


Keywords: children (age groups); young people; cognitive development; aggressiveness; study performance

Free keywords: aggression; cognition; development; educational attainment; school performance


Contributing organizations


Ministry reporting: No, publication in press


Last updated on 2020-18-08 at 13:03