A3 Book section, Chapters in research books
The Historiae Florentini populi by Poggio Bracciolini : Genesis and Fortune of an Alternative History of Florence (2020)


Merisalo, O. (2020). The Historiae Florentini populi by Poggio Bracciolini : Genesis and Fortune of an Alternative History of Florence. In R. Ricci, & E. L. Pumory (Eds.), Poggio Bracciolini and the Re(dis)covery of Antiquity: Textual and Material Traditions : Proceedings of the Symposium Held at Bryn Mawr College on April 8-9, 2016 (pp. 25-40). Firenze University Press. Atti, 38. https://doi.org/10.36253/978-88-6453-968-3.05


JYU authors or editors


Publication details

All authors or editors: Merisalo, Outi

Parent publication: Poggio Bracciolini and the Re(dis)covery of Antiquity: Textual and Material Traditions : Proceedings of the Symposium Held at Bryn Mawr College on April 8-9, 2016

Parent publication editors: Ricci, Roberta; Pumory, Eric L.

ISBN: 978-88-6453-967-6

eISBN: 978-88-6453-968-3

Journal or series: Atti

ISSN: 2239-3307

eISSN: 2704-6230

Publication year: 2020

Number in series: 38

Pages range: 25-40

Number of pages in the book: 205

Publisher: Firenze University Press

Place of Publication: Firenze

Publication country: Italy

Publication language: English

DOI: https://doi.org/10.36253/978-88-6453-968-3.05

Persistent website address: https://fupress.com/redir.ashx?RetUrl=3978_23493.pdf

Publication open access: Openly available

Publication channel open access: Open Access channel

Publication is parallel published (JYX): https://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/70910


Abstract

During the last years of his life, Poggio Bracciolini (1380-1459), former Apostolic Secretary and Chancellor of Florence, was working on a long text that he characterized, in a letter written in 1458, as lacking a well-defined structure. This was most probably his history of the people of Florence (Historiae Florentini populi, the title given in Jacopo’s dedication copy to Frederick of Montefeltro, Duke of Urbino), revised and published posthumously by Poggio’s son, Jacopo Bracciolini (1442-1478). Contrary to what is often assumed, Poggio’s treatise was not a continuation, nor even a complement, to Leonardo Bruni’s (1370-1444) official history of Florence. It concentrates on the most recent history of Florence from the fourteenth-century conflicts between Florence and Milan through Florentine expansion in Tuscany and finally reaching the mid-fifteenth century. This article will study the genesis and fortune of the work in the context of Poggio’s literary output and the manuscript evidence from the mid-fifteenth century until the first printed edition of the Latin-language text by G.B. Recanati in 1715


Keywords: history; Renaissance; book history; manuscripts; humanism

Free keywords: Florence; Italian humanism; manuscript tradition; historiography; Medici


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Ministry reporting: Yes

Reporting Year: 2020

JUFO rating: 1


Last updated on 2022-17-06 at 12:38