A2 Review article, Literature review, Systematic review
Running away from cardiovascular disease at the right speed : the impact of aerobic physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness on cardiovascular disease risk and associated subclinical phenotypes (2020)


Mehta, A., Kondamudi, N., Laukkanen, J. A., Wisloff, U., Franklin, B. A., Arena, R., Lavie, C. J., & Pandey, A. (2020). Running away from cardiovascular disease at the right speed : the impact of aerobic physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness on cardiovascular disease risk and associated subclinical phenotypes. Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases, 63(3), 762-774. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pcad.2020.11.004


JYU authors or editors


Publication details

All authors or editorsMehta, Anurag; Kondamudi, Nitin; Laukkanen, Jari A.; Wisloff, Ulrik; Franklin, Barry A.; Arena, Ross; Lavie, Carl J.; Pandey, Ambarish

Journal or seriesProgress in Cardiovascular Diseases

ISSN0033-0620

eISSN1873-1740

Publication year2020

Volume63

Issue number3

Pages range762-774

PublisherElsevier

Publication countryUnited States

Publication languageEnglish

DOIhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.pcad.2020.11.004

Publication open accessNot open

Publication channel open access

Publication is parallel published (JYX)https://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/73261


Abstract

Higher levels of physical activity (PA) and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) are associated with lower risk of incident cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the relationship of aerobic PA and CRF with risk of atherosclerotic CVD outcomes and heart failure (HF) seem to be distinct. Furthermore, recent studies have raised concerns of potential toxicity associated with extreme levels of aerobic exercise, with higher levels of coronary artery calcium and incident atrial fibrillation noted among individuals with very high PA levels. In contrast, the relationship between PA levels and measures of left ventricular structure and function and risk of HF is more linear. Thus, personalizing exercise levels to optimal doses may be key to achieving beneficial outcomes and preventing adverse CVD events among high risk individuals. In this report, we provide a comprehensive review of the literature on the associations of aerobic PA and CRF levels with risk of adverse CVD outcomes and the preceding subclinical cardiac phenotypes to better characterize the optimal exercise dose needed to favorably modify CVD risk.


Keywordsphysical activityexercise (people)aerobic trainingphysical fitnesscardiovascular diseasesheart failureatrial fibrillation

Free keywordsphysical activity; fitness; prevention; coronary artery disease; heart failure; atrial fibrillation


Contributing organizations


Ministry reportingYes

Reporting Year2020

JUFO rating1


Last updated on 2024-22-04 at 13:58