A1 Journal article (refereed)
Adolescents with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes : psychological flexibility is associated with the glycemic control, quality of life and depressive symptoms (2021)


Alho, Iina; Joro, Mirka; Juntunen, Laura; Muotka, Joona; Lappalainen, Raimo (2021). Adolescents with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes : psychological flexibility is associated with the glycemic control, quality of life and depressive symptoms. Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science, 19, 50-56. DOI: 10.1016/j.jcbs.2020.12.003


JYU authors or editors


Publication details

All authors or editors: Alho, Iina; Joro, Mirka; Juntunen, Laura; Muotka, Joona; Lappalainen, Raimo

Journal or series: Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science

ISSN: 2212-1447

eISSN: 2212-1455

Publication year: 2021

Volume: 19

Pages range: 50-56

Publisher: Elsevier BV

Publication country: Netherlands

Publication language: English

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcbs.2020.12.003

Open Access: Publication channel is not openly available

Publication is parallel published (JYX): https://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/73543


Abstract

This study investigates the role of psychological flexibility in relation to glycaemic control (HbA1c) and quality of life among adolescents with poorly-controlled diabetes. Adolescents (n = 65, aged 12–16 years) completed the Children and Adolescents Mindfulness Measure (CAMM), the Diabetes Acceptance and Action Scale for Children and Adolescents (DAAS), the Depression Scale (RBDI), and the Health-Related Quality of Life Scale (KINDL-R). HbA1c values were collected from medical records. A higher level of psychological flexibility was associated with better glycaemic control, better quality of life, and lower levels of depressive and anxiety symptoms. Mediation analysis showed that diabetes-related psychological flexibility mediated the relationship between glycaemic control and depressive symptoms as well as quality of life. The observations in the current study support the view that adolescents with type 1 diabetes would benefit from training their psychological flexibility skills.


Keywords: juvenile diabetes; self-care; young people; psychological factors; resiliency (flexibility); quality of life; depression (mental disorders)

Free keywords: type 1 diabetes; adolescence; psychological flexibility; quality of life


Contributing organizations


Ministry reporting: Yes

Preliminary JUFO rating: 1


Last updated on 2021-07-01 at 12:24