B2 Book section
From Country Girl in Southern Finland to Longitudinal Research into Alternatives to Aggression and Violence (2021)


Pulkkinen, Lea (2021). From Country Girl in Southern Finland to Longitudinal Research into Alternatives to Aggression and Violence. In Tremblay, Richard E. (Eds.) The Science of Violent Behavior Development and Prevention : Contributions of the Second World War Generation (pp. 71-94). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. DOI: 10.1017/9781108877138.005


JYU authors or editors


Publication details

All authors or editors: Pulkkinen, Lea

Parent publication: The Science of Violent Behavior Development and Prevention : Contributions of the Second World War Generation

Parent publication editors: Tremblay, Richard E.

ISBN: 978-1-108-81989-3

eISBN: 978-1-108-87713-8

Publication year: 2021

Pages range: 71-94

Number of pages in the book: 388

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Place of Publication: Cambridge

Publication country: United Kingdom

Publication language: English

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108877138.005

Open Access: Publication channel is not openly available

Publication channel open access:

Publication open access:

Publication is parallel published (JYX): https://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/74200


Abstract

Lea Pulkkinen, born in Finland in 1939, is Emerita Professor of Psychology at the University of Jyväskylä (Finland). She is best known for creating the ongoing Jyväskylä Longitudinal Study of Personality and Social Development (JLSPSD). The study was specifically intended to test the hypothesis that the human brain allows for more variation in behavior than the simple ‘fight or flight’ response observed in animal studies of aggression. She further hypothesized that humans’ capacity for cognitive control over emotional behavior was the key factor involved in controlling aggressive behavior. These hypotheses led her to devise an impulse control model to depict behavioral alternatives, which she tested with teacher and peer ratings of aggressive and nonaggressive behaviors. Forty years later, the JLSPSD revealed the long-term significance of self-regulation for socio-emotional behavior. Results from the study showed that aggressive behavior during childhood tends to be associated with other types of under-controlled behavior during adulthood. On the other hand, ‘constructive’ behavior in childhood tends to lead to positive social relations, mental health, and successful integration in the work force.


Keywords: biographical history; life history; autobiographical approach; researchers; research history; personality psychology; personality; social development; emotions; aggressiveness; self-regulation (control); mental health; labour (workforce); placement (work); longitudinal research

Free keywords: longitudinal study; personality; social development; fight or flight; cognitive control; emotional behavior; impulse control; self-regulation; mental health; work force


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Ministry reporting: Yes


Last updated on 2021-12-02 at 12:53