A1 Journal article (refereed)
Acute Effects of High-intensity Resistance Exercise on Cognitive Function (2021)


Anders, J. P. V., Kraemer, W. J., Newton, R. U., Post, E. M., Caldwell, L. K., Beeler, M. K., DuPont, W. H., Martini, E. R., Volek, J. S., Häkkinen, K., Maresh, C. M., & Hayes, S. M. (2021). Acute Effects of High-intensity Resistance Exercise on Cognitive Function. Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 20, 391-397. https://doi.org/10.52082/jssm.2021.391


JYU authors or editors


Publication details

All authors or editorsAnders, John Paul V.; Kraemer, William J.; Newton, Robert U.; Post, Emily M.; Caldwell, Lydia K.; Beeler, Matthew K.; DuPont, William H.; Martini, Emily R.; Volek, Jeff S.; Häkkinen, Keijo; et al.

Journal or seriesJournal of Sports Science and Medicine

ISSN1303-2968

eISSN1303-2968

Publication year2021

Publication date03/05/2021

Volume20

Pages range391-397

PublisherUludag University

Publication countryTurkey

Publication languageEnglish

DOIhttps://doi.org/10.52082/jssm.2021.391

Publication open accessOpenly available

Publication channel open accessOpen Access channel

Publication is parallel published (JYX)https://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/75442


Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to examine the influence of an acute bout of high-intensity resistance exercise on measures of cognitive function. Ten men (Mean ± SD: age = 24.4 ± 3.2 yrs; body mass = 85.7 ± 11.8 kg; height = 1.78 ± 0.08 m; 1 repetition maximum (1RM) = 139.0 ± 24.1 kg) gave informed consent and performed a high-intensity 6 sets of 10 repetitions of barbell back squat exercise at 80% 1RM with 2 minutes rest between sets. The Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM) was completed to assess various cognitive domains during the familiarization period, immediately before, and immediately after the high-intensity resistance exercise bout. The repeated measures ANOVAs for throughput scores (r·m-1) demonstrated significant mean differences for the Mathematical Processing task (MTH; p < 0.001, η2p = 0.625) where post hoc pairwise comparisons demonstrated that the post-fatigue throughput (32.0 ± 8.8 r·m-1) was significantly greater than the pre-fatigue (23.8 ± 7.4 r·m-1, p = 0.003, d = 1.01) and the familiarization throughput (26.4 ± 5.3 r·m-1, p = 0.024, d = 0.77). The Coded Substitution-Delay task also demonstrated significant mean differences (CDD; p = 0.027, η2p = 0.394) with post hoc pairwise comparisons demonstrating that the post-fatigue throughput (49.3 ± 14.4 r·m-1) was significantly less than the pre-fatigue throughput (63.2 ± 9.6 r·m-1, p = 0.011, d = 1.14). The repeated measures ANOVAs for reaction time (ms) demonstrated significant mean differences for MTH (p < 0.001, η2p = 0.624) where post hoc pairwise comparisons demonstrated that the post-fatigue reaction time (1885.2 ± 582.8 ms) was significantly less than the pre-fatigue (2518.2 ± 884.8 ms, p = 0.005, d = 0.85) and familiarization (2253.7 ± 567.6 ms, p = 0.009, d = 0.64) reaction times. The Go/No-Go task demonstrated significant mean differences (GNG; p = 0.031, η2p = 0.320) with post hoc pairwise comparisons demonstrating that the post-fatigue (285.9 ± 16.3 ms) was significantly less than the pre-fatigue (298.5 ± 12.1 ms, p = 0.006, d = 0.88) reaction times. High-intensity resistance exercise may elicit domain-specific influences on cognitive function, characterized by the facilitation of simple cognitive tasks and impairments of complex cognitive tasks.


Keywordsstrength trainingphysical stresscognitive processesreactionssports physiology

Free keywordsmuscle fatigue; automated neuropsychological assessment metrics; back squat; exercise stress


Contributing organizations


Ministry reportingYes

Reporting Year2021

JUFO rating1


Last updated on 2024-03-04 at 20:16