A3 Book section, Chapters in research books
The Networked Utilisation of Satellite Images and Geospatial Technology in Journalism (2022)


Ikonen, P., Hokkanen, J., Uskali, T., Manninen, V. J. E., & Kuusniemi, H. (2022). The Networked Utilisation of Satellite Images and Geospatial Technology in Journalism. In V. J. E. Manninen, M. K. Niemi, & A. Ridge-Newman (Eds.), Futures of Journalism : Technology-stimulated Evolution in the Audience-News Media Relationship (pp. 245-260). Palgrave Macmillan. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-95073-6_16


JYU authors or editors


Publication details

All authors or editors: Ikonen, Pasi; Hokkanen, Jere; Uskali, Turo; Manninen, Ville J. E.; Kuusniemi, Heidi

Parent publication: Futures of Journalism : Technology-stimulated Evolution in the Audience-News Media Relationship

Parent publication editors: Manninen, Ville J. E.; Niemi, Mari K.; Ridge-Newman, Anthony

ISBN: 978-3-030-95072-9

eISBN: 978-3-030-95073-6

Publication year: 2022

Publication date: 05/05/2022

Pages range: 245-260

Number of pages in the book: 373

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

Place of Publication: Cham

Publication country: Switzerland

Publication language: English

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-95073-6_16

Publication open access: Not open

Publication channel open access:

Publication is parallel published (JYX): https://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/81220


Abstract

Satellite technology has become increasingly affordable and accessible in the past few decades. This has enabled many newsrooms to engage with genuinely remote journalism.

This chapter explores the networked nature of satellite journalism and investigates its inclusion of experts and citizens outside newsrooms. Satellite journalism uses satellite-borne technology either as a (1) part of storytelling or (2) source of information. Academic research on the topic is scarce, so this chapter builds a base of knowledge on the contemporary practices, limitations and ethics—as well as directions of future development—of satellite journalism.

By interviewing six journalists and one earth observation expert, and by analysing the case of the Bellingcat group, we shed light on how satellite journalism works. We argue that journalist–audience collaboration has the potential to deepen further as satellite technology develops, thereby rewarding organisations that participate in networked co-creation. Developing technologies, however, will also introduce new ethical considerations.


Keywords: satellite images; geographic information; journalism; networks (societal phenomena)

Free keywords: networked utilisation; satellite images; geospatial technology; journalism


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Ministry reporting: Yes

Reporting Year: 2022

Preliminary JUFO rating: 3


Last updated on 2022-20-09 at 14:13