A1 Journal article (refereed)
Contextualizing Everyday Data Literacies : The Case of Recreational Runners (2023)


Palsa, L., & Mertala, P. (2023). Contextualizing Everyday Data Literacies : The Case of Recreational Runners. International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, Early online. https://doi.org/10.1080/10447318.2023.2241612


JYU authors or editors


Publication details

All authors or editorsPalsa, Lauri; Mertala, Pekka

Journal or seriesInternational Journal of Human-Computer Interaction

ISSN1044-7318

eISSN1532-7590

Publication year2023

Publication date03/08/2023

VolumeEarly online

PublisherInforma UK Limited

Publication countryUnited States

Publication languageEnglish

DOIhttps://doi.org/10.1080/10447318.2023.2241612

Publication open accessOpenly available

Publication channel open accessPartially open access channel

Publication is parallel published (JYX)https://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/88800

Web address of parallel published publication (pre-print)https://doi.org/10.35542/osf.io/ab5r2


Abstract

Data literacy is typically described in a decontextualized manner, and many data literacy frameworks are detached from the “messy” realities of everyday life. In the present study, we selected a specific context (recreational running), specific data technology (self-tracking devices), and specific viewpoint (accuracy of data and analyses) to construct a substantial theory of (one form of) contextual data literacy. The research question is: How does recreational runners’ everyday data literacy appear in relation to the accuracy of measurements and analyses of self-tracking devices? Through an abductive analysis of qualitative survey data (N = 1057), we identified the data literacy actions that runners engaged with when assessing the accuracy of data in relation to their subjective needs, objectives, and life situations. The first-order data literacy actions (comparison and evaluation) captured how runners assessed and analyzed the accuracy of data, and they took place mainly in the immediate context of running. The second-order data literacy actions (acceptance, adaptation, and optimization) were the result of the runners’ reflections on what they sought from running and how they valued data, as well as their broader life situation.


Keywordsdatawearable technologymeasurementrunningexercise (people)conditionobjectivescontextliteracy

Free keywordsdata literacy; self-tracking; running; contextualization; wearables


Contributing organizations


Ministry reportingYes

Reporting Year2023

JUFO rating2


Last updated on 2024-14-06 at 23:06